Genetic evidence for female host-specific races of the common cuckoo

@article{Gibbs2000GeneticEF,
  title={Genetic evidence for female host-specific races of the common cuckoo},
  author={H. Lisle Gibbs and Michael D. Sorenson and Karen Marchetti and Michael de L. Brooke and Nicholas Barry Davies and Hiroshi K. Nakamura},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2000},
  volume={407},
  pages={183-186}
}
The common cuckoo Cuculus canorus is divided into host-specific races (gentes). Females of each race lay a distinctive egg type that tends to match the host's eggs, for instance, brown and spotted for meadow pipit hosts or plain blue for redstart hosts. The puzzle is how these gentes remain distinct. Here, we provide genetic evidence that gentes are restricted to female lineages, with cross mating by males maintaining the common cuckoo genetically as one species. We show that there is… 

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