Genetic evidence for a recent origin by hybridization of red wolves

@article{Reich1999GeneticEF,
  title={Genetic evidence for a recent origin by hybridization of red wolves},
  author={David Reich and Robert K. Wayne and David B. Goldstein},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={1999},
  volume={8}
}
Genetic data suggest that red wolves (Canis rufus) resulted from a hybridization between coyotes (C. latrans) and grey wolves (C. lupus). The date of the hybridization, however, is uncertain. According to one hypothesis, the two species came into contact as coyotes increased their geographical range in conjunction with the advance of European settlers and as grey wolves were extirpated from the American south. Alternatively, the red wolves could have originated tens of thousands of years ago as… Expand
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