Genetic evidence for Near-Eastern origins of European cattle

@article{Troy2001GeneticEF,
  title={Genetic evidence for Near-Eastern origins of European cattle},
  author={C. S. Troy and D. MacHugh and J. F. Bailey and D. A. Magee and R. Loftus and P. Cunningham and A. Chamberlain and B. Sykes and D. Bradley},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2001},
  volume={410},
  pages={1088-1091}
}
The limited ranges of the wild progenitors of many of the primary European domestic species point to their origins further east in Anatolia or the fertile crescent. The wild ox (Bos primigenius), however, ranged widely and it is unknown whether it was domesticated within Europe as one feature of a local contribution to the farming economy. Here we examine mitochondrial DNA control-region sequence variation from 392 extant animals sampled from Europe, Africa and the Near East, and compare this… Expand
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