Genetic diversity confers colony-level benefits due to individual immunity

@article{SimoneFinstrom2016GeneticDC,
  title={Genetic diversity confers colony-level benefits due to individual immunity},
  author={Michael Simone-Finstrom and Megan E. Walz and David R. Tarpy},
  journal={Biology Letters},
  year={2016},
  volume={12}
}
Several costs and benefits arise as a consequence of eusociality and group-living. With increasing group size, spread of disease among nest-mates poses selective pressure on both individual immunity and group-level mechanisms of disease resistance (social immunity). Another factor known to influence colony-level expression of disease is intracolony genetic diversity, which in honeybees (Apis mellifera) is a direct function of the number of mates of the queen. Colonies headed by queens with… 

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