Genetic diversity and population structure of Tasmanian devils, the largest marsupial carnivore

@article{Jones2004GeneticDA,
  title={Genetic diversity and population structure of Tasmanian devils, the largest marsupial carnivore},
  author={Menna E. Jones and David H. Paetkau and Eli Geffen and Craig C Moritz},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={13}
}
Genetic diversity and population structure were investigated across the core range of Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus laniarius; Dasyuridae), a wide‐ranging marsupial carnivore restricted to the island of Tasmania. Heterozygosity (0.386–0.467) and allelic diversity (2.7–3.3) were low in all subpopulations and allelic size ranges were small and almost continuous, consistent with a founder effect. Island effects and repeated periods of low population density may also have contributed to the low… 
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