Genetic differentiation within and between isolated Algerian subpopulations of Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus): evidence from microsatellites

@article{VonSegesser1999GeneticDW,
  title={Genetic differentiation within and between isolated Algerian subpopulations of Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus): evidence from microsatellites},
  author={Franziska Von Segesser and Nelly M{\'e}nard and Belkacem Gaci and R. Dom{\'i}nguez Mart{\'i}n},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={1999},
  volume={8}
}
This study of wild‐living Algerian Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) was designed to examine genetic variability in subpopulations isolated in residual forest patches, in an attempt to obtain data on the effects of habitat fragmentation. The wild population of this species (estimated at a maximum of 15 000) is vulnerable and this study therefore has direct relevance for conservation measures. Data from five microsatellite loci were analysed for 159 individuals from nine different groups living… Expand
Phylogeography of Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) and the origin of the Gibraltar colony.
TLDR
There is a deep division between two main subpopulations in Algeria and one marked secondary division, with haplotypes generally matching geographical distribution, whereas Moroccan sub Populations show little divergence in hypervariable region I sequences and little correspondence with geographical distribution. Expand
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ISOLATION BY DISTANCE IN THE ATLANTIC COD, GADUS MORHUA, AT LARGE AND SMALL GEOGRAPHIC SCALES
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The correlation between gene flow and distance detected in G. morhua at small and large spatial scales suggests that dispersal distances and effective population sizes are much smaller than predicted for the species and that the recent age of populations, rather than extensive gene flow, may be responsible for its weak population structure. Expand
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TLDR
The correlation between gene flow and distance detected in G. morhua at small and large spatial scales suggests that dispersal distances and effective population sizes are much smaller than predicted for the species and that the recent age of populations, rather than extensive gene flow, may be responsible for its weak population structure. Expand
New Data on the Current Distribution of Barbary Macaque Macaca sylvanus (Mammalia: Cercopithecidae) in Algeria
The Barbary macaque, Macaca sylvanus (Linnaeus, 1758), is the only species of non-human primate living in Morocco and Algeria, North Africa. It is classified as Endangered on the IUCN Red List andExpand
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