Genetic analysis of chemosensory traits in human twins.

@article{Knaapila2012GeneticAO,
  title={Genetic analysis of chemosensory traits in human twins.},
  author={Antti J Knaapila and Liang-Dar Hwang and Anna Lysenko and Fujiko F. Duke and Brad D. Fesi and Amin Khoshnevisan and R. Saint James and Charles J. Wysocki and Mee-Ra Rhyu and Michael G. Tordoff and Alexander A. Bachmanov and Emi Mura and Hajime Nagai and Danielle R. Reed},
  journal={Chemical senses},
  year={2012},
  volume={37 9},
  pages={
          869-81
        }
}
We explored genetic influences on the perception of taste and smell stimuli. Adult twins rated the chemosensory aspects of water, sucrose, sodium chloride, citric acid, ethanol, quinine hydrochloride, phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), potassium chloride, calcium chloride, cinnamon, androstenone, Galaxolide™, cilantro, and basil. For most traits, individual differences were stable over time and some traits were heritable (h(2) from 0.41 to 0.71). Subjects were genotyped for 44 single nucleotide… Expand
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