Genetic Structure and Extinction of the Woolly Mammoth, Mammuthus primigenius

@article{Barnes2007GeneticSA,
  title={Genetic Structure and Extinction of the Woolly Mammoth, Mammuthus primigenius},
  author={I. Barnes and B. Shapiro and A. Lister and T. Kuznetsova and A. Sher and Dale Guthrie and Mark George Thomas},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={17},
  pages={1072-1075}
}
The interval since circa 50 Ka has been a period of significant species extinctions among the large mammal fauna. However, the relative roles of an increasing human presence and a synchronous series of complex environmental changes in these extinctions have yet to be fully resolved. Recent analyses of fossil material from Beringia have clarified our understanding of the spatiotemporal pattern of Late Pleistocene extinctions, identifying periods of population turnover well before the last… Expand
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TLDR
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