Genetic Load in Sexual and Asexual Diploids: Segregation, Dominance and Genetic Drift

@article{Haag2007GeneticLI,
  title={Genetic Load in Sexual and Asexual Diploids: Segregation, Dominance and Genetic Drift},
  author={Christoph R. Haag and Denis Roze},
  journal={Genetics},
  year={2007},
  volume={176},
  pages={1663 - 1678}
}
In diploid organisms, sexual reproduction rearranges allelic combinations between loci (recombination) as well as within loci (segregation). Several studies have analyzed the effect of segregation on the genetic load due to recurrent deleterious mutations, but considered infinite populations, thus neglecting the effects of genetic drift. Here, we use single-locus models to explore the combined effects of segregation, selection, and drift. We find that, for partly recessive deleterious alleles… 
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