Genetic Conflicts

@article{Hurst1996GeneticC,
  title={Genetic Conflicts},
  author={Laurence D. Hurst and Anne Atlan and Bengt Olle Bengtsson},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={1996},
  volume={71},
  pages={317 - 364}
}
Self-promoting elements (also called ultraselfish genes, selfish genes, or selfish genetic elements) are vertically trasmitted genetic entities that manipulate their "host" so as to promote their own spread, usually at a cost to other genes within the genome. Examples of such elements include meiotic drive genes and cytoplasmic sexatio distorters. The spread of a self-promoting element creates the context for the spread of a suppressor acting whithin the same genome. We may thus say that a… 
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This work model the evolutionary success of a selfish element, such as a transposable element or endosymbiont, which is capable of creating or strengthening a germline-soma distinction in a primitively multicellular host, and finds that it will always benefit the element to do so.
Opinion: Genetic Conflict With Mobile Elements Drives Eukaryotic Genome Evolution, and Perhaps Also Eukaryogenesis.
Through analyses of diverse microeukaryotes, we have previously argued that eukaryotic genomes are dynamic systems that rely on epigenetic mechanisms to distinguish germline (i.e., DNA to be
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References

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TLDR
This work has shown that sexes are the result of selection on nuclear genes to coordinate the inheritance of cytoplasmic genomes so as to prevent competition between unrelated cy toplasmics genomes and this hypothesis is tested against five comparative predictions and shown to receive considerable empirical support.
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TLDR
It is argued that intragenomic conflict might be an important evolutionary force, and may influence the evolution of sex determining systems, sex allocation systems and post-zygotic isolating mechanisms.
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A quantitative population genetics model for the evolution of transposable genetic elements is developed. This model shows that "selfish" DNA sequences do not have to be selectively neutral at the
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TLDR
Evidence is presented in which the fitness of cytoplasmic and other non-autosomal genetic sets are increased at the expense of the autosomal genetic set, and the relationship of such intragenomic conflict to the evolution of anisogamy, dioecy, skewed sex ratios, differential male mortality, systems of sex determination, and altruism is discussed.
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is shown that, depending on the rate of in- and outbreeding, a variety of transmission patterns of cytoplasmic factors may be expected, and the most robust prediction is that somatic fusion between close relatives, as guaranteed by com patibility at highly polymorphic loci, is expected to provide the conditions for biparental inheritance.
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    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
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TLDR
It is found that through most parameter space, following the invasion of cytoplasmic incompatibility inducing Wolbachia into an uninfected population, not only will the sterilizing effect wane but the conditions become permissive for the spread of the uninfecting cytotype.
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TLDR
This work has suggested that a host of phenomena, from exquisite details of gene expression to the evolution of crossing over, may all be explicable as the result of conflict within the nuclear genome.
GENOMIC CONFLICTS UNDERLYING HALDANE'S RULE
TLDR
Find strong theoretical and empirical support for the hypothesis that hybrid disruption could result from selfish genetic elements attempting to pervert the sex ratio and remain confident that the evolution of sex ratio distorters within species, and selfish Genetic elements in general, can in principle explain cases of hybrid sterility.
Genetic Conflicts and the Paradox of Sex Determination : Three Paths to the Evolution of Female Intersexuality in a Mammal
That sex determining systems ever change is paradoxical but can be explained by noting that conflict between selfish elements and their modifiers will often cause a shift in sex determining strategy.
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