Genes or Culture: Are Mitochondrial Genes Associated with Tool Use in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops sp.)?

@article{Bacher2010GenesOC,
  title={Genes or Culture: Are Mitochondrial Genes Associated with Tool Use in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops sp.)?},
  author={Kathrin Bacher and Simon J. Allen and Anna K. Lindholm and Lars Bejder and Michael Kr{\"u}tzen},
  journal={Behavior Genetics},
  year={2010},
  volume={40},
  pages={706-714}
}
Some bottlenose dolphins use marine sponges as foraging tools (‘sponging’), which appears to be socially transmitted from mothers mainly to their female offspring. Yet, explanations alternative to social transmission have been proposed. Firstly, the propensity to engage in sponging might be due to differences in diving ability caused by variation of mitochondrial genes coding for proteins of the respiratory chain. Secondly, the cultural technique of sponging may have selected for changes in… Expand
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