Genes Record a Prehistoric Volcano Eruption in the Galápagos

@article{Beheregaray2003GenesRA,
  title={Genes Record a Prehistoric Volcano Eruption in the Galápagos},
  author={Luciano Bellagamba Beheregaray and Claudio Ciofi and Dennis J. Geist and James P. Gibbs and Adalgisa Caccone and Jeffrey R. Powell},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={302},
  pages={75 - 75}
}
Volcanic islands provide notable examples of the parallel between a changing geographic area and its changing biota. This is particularly true for young islands where volcanic activity is known to dictate the rate of population extinction and recolonization and to influence evolutionary 
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