General deterrent effects of police patrol in crime “hot spots”: A randomized, controlled trial

@article{Sherman1995GeneralDE,
  title={General deterrent effects of police patrol in crime “hot spots”: A randomized, controlled trial},
  author={Lawrence W. Sherman and David Weisburd},
  journal={Justice Quarterly},
  year={1995},
  volume={12},
  pages={625-648}
}
Many criminologists doubt that the dosage of uniformed police patrol causes any measurable difference in crime. This article reports a one-year randomized trial in Minneapolis of increases in patrol dosage at 55 of 110 crime “hot spots,” monitored by 7,542 hours of systematic observations. The experimental group received, on average, twice as much observed patrol presence, although the ratio displayed wide seasonal fluctuation. Reductions in total crime calls ranged from 6 percent to 13 percent… 
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