General and abdominal adiposity and risk of death in Europe.

@article{Pischon2008GeneralAA,
  title={General and abdominal adiposity and risk of death in Europe.},
  author={T. Pischon and H. Boeing and K. Hoffmann and M. Bergmann and M. Schulze and K. Overvad and Y. T. van der Schouw and E. Spencer and K. Moons and A. Tj{\o}nneland and J. Halkjaer and M. Jensen and J. Stegger and F. Clavel-Chapelon and M. Boutron‐Ruault and V. Chaj{\`e}s and J. Linseisen and R. Kaaks and A. Trichopoulou and D. Trichopoulos and C. Bamia and S. Sieri and D. Palli and R. Tumino and P. Vineis and S. Panico and P. Peeters and A. May and H. Bueno-de-Mesquita and F. V. van Duijnhoven and G. Hallmans and L. Weinehall and J. Manjer and B. Hedblad and E. Lund and A. Agudo and L. Arri{\'o}la and A. Barricarte and C. Navarro and C. Mart{\'i}nez and J. Quir{\'o}s and T. Key and S. Bingham and K. Khaw and P. Boffetta and M. Jenab and P. Ferrari and E. Riboli},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={359 20},
  pages={
          2105-20
        }
}
BACKGROUND Previous studies have relied predominantly on the body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) to assess the association of adiposity with the risk of death, but few have examined whether the distribution of body fat contributes to the prediction of death. METHODS We examined the association of BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with the risk of death among 359,387 participants from nine countries in the European… Expand
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Lifetime alcohol use is positive related to abdominal and general adiposity in men, possibly following the male weight gain pattern; in women, it is positively related only to abdominal adiposity. Expand
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The results imply that BMI or percent body fat could be used to identify lean individuals at increased mortality risk. Expand
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Fat percentage does not add to prediction of mortality or CVD in middle-aged and older-aged adults and WHR appeared to have the best predictive value among three indices. Expand
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BMI has an inverse, and WC has a direct, independent association with mortality in older adults, particularly in those with worse health status, and these associations were mainly observed inThose with limitations in mobility and agility. Expand
Body mass index and all-cause mortality in a large Chinese cohort
Background Obesity is known to be associated with an increased risk of death, but current definitions of obesity are based on data from white populations. We examined the association between bodyExpand
Body Adiposity Index and Cardiovascular Health Risk Factors in Caucasians: A Comparison with the Body Mass Index and Others
TLDR
Results of the study indicated that BAI was less correlated with cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic risk factors than other adiposity indexes (BMI, WC and WHtR) and may be better candidates than BAI to evaluate metabolic and cardiovascular risk in both clinical practice and research. Expand
Adiposity and mortality in Korean adults: a population-based prospective cohort study.
TLDR
The data suggest a strong positive association between adiposity and mortality in a population without pre-existing disease and that the current cutoff for overweight (BMI ≥23) may require re-evaluation and that BMI alone may not be a useful measure for indicating adiposity in Asians. Expand
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