Gene sharing in lens and cornea: facts and implications

@article{Piatigorsky1998GeneSI,
  title={Gene sharing in lens and cornea: facts and implications},
  author={Joram Piatigorsky},
  journal={Progress in Retinal and Eye Research},
  year={1998},
  volume={17},
  pages={145-174}
}
  • J. Piatigorsky
  • Published 1998
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Progress in Retinal and Eye Research
The major water-soluble proteins (crystallins) responsible for the optical properties of the cellular lenses of vertebrates and invertebrates are surprisingly diverse and often differ among species (i.e., are taxon-specific). Many crystallins are encoded by the identical gene specifying a stress protein or a metabolic enzyme which has non-refractive functions in numerous tissues. This double use of a distinct protein has been called gene sharing. Abundant expression of various metabolic enzymes… Expand
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