Gene loss, thermogenesis, and the origin of birds

@article{Newman2013GeneLT,
  title={Gene loss, thermogenesis, and the origin of birds},
  author={Stuart A. Newman and Nadezhda V Mezentseva and Alexander V. Badyaev},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2013},
  volume={1289}
}
Compared to related taxa, birds have exceptionally enlarged and diversified skeletal muscles, features that are closely associated with skeletal diversification and are commonly explained by a diversity of avian ecological niches and locomotion types. The thermogenic muscle hypothesis (TMH) for the origin of birds proposes that such muscle hyperplasia and the associated skeletal innovations are instead the consequence of the avian clade originating from an ancestral population that underwent… Expand
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