Gene flow and pathogen transmission among bobcats (Lynx rufus) in a fragmented urban landscape

@article{Lee2012GeneFA,
  title={Gene flow and pathogen transmission among bobcats (Lynx rufus) in a fragmented urban landscape},
  author={Justin S. Lee and Emily W. Ruell and Erin E. Boydston and Lisa M. Lyren and Robert Scott Alonso and Jennifer L. Troyer and Kevin R. Crooks and Sue Vandewoude},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2012},
  volume={21}
}
Urbanization can result in the fragmentation of once contiguous natural landscapes into a patchy habitat interspersed within a growing urban matrix. Animals living in fragmented landscapes often have reduced movement among habitat patches because of avoidance of intervening human development, which potentially leads to both reduced gene flow and pathogen transmission between patches. Mammalian carnivores with large home ranges, such as bobcats (Lynx rufus), may be particularly sensitive to… 
Urban landscapes can change virus gene flow and evolution in a fragmentation‐sensitive carnivore
TLDR
It is found that the urban landscape played a significant role in shaping FIV transmission and its evolution in a carnivore living in one of the most fragmented and urban systems in North America.
Connectivity of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) populations in a highly fragmented urban landscape
ContextUrbanization is a substantial force shaping the genetic and demographic structure of natural populations. Urban development and major highways can limit animal movements, and thus gene flow,
Urbanization reduces genetic connectivity in bobcats (Lynx rufus) at both intra– and interpopulation spatial scales
TLDR
The results demonstrate the importance of replicating landscape genetic analyses across populations and considering how landscape genetic effects may vary with spatial scale and local landscape structure, and confirm a pervasive impact of urbanization largely independent of spatial scale.
Host relatedness and landscape connectivity shape pathogen spread in the puma, a large secretive carnivore
TLDR
The results show that landscape variables and host gene flow explained significant amounts of variation in virus spread in a region bounded by urban development but did not in a more wild landscape, demonstrating how anthropogenic landscapes can alter pathogen spread.
Host relatedness and landscape connectivity shape pathogen spread in a large secretive carnivore
TLDR
It is found landscape variables and host gene flow explained significant amounts of variation of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) spread in the WUI, but not in the unbounded region.
Disease and freeways drive genetic change in urban bobcat populations
TLDR
Investigation of the influence that urbanization and a disease epizootic had on the population genetics of bobcats distributed across a highly fragmented urban landscape found that two freeways are significant barriers to gene flow.
Does the virus cross the road? Viral phylogeographic patterns among bobcat populations reflect a history of urban development
TLDR
Investigating phylogenetic relationships among FIV isolates sampled from five bobcat populations in coastal southern California indicates that major barriers to host gene flow can also act as barriers to pathogen spread, suggesting potentially reduced susceptibility of fragmented populations to novel directly transmitted pathogens.
Carnivore population structure across an urbanization gradient: a regional genetic analysis of bobcats in southern California
Context In human-dominated landscapes, habitat fragmentation and barriers to movement can interrupt gene flow. While often considered at a local extent, regional analyses are also needed to reveal
Lack of Population Genetic Structuring in Ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in a Fragmented Landscape
TLDR
Molecular variation in ocelot populations sampled in two Atlantic Forest fragments are still not significantly different genetically, a pattern that strongly contrasts with that previously observed in jaguars for the same comparisons.
Demographic changes and loss of genetic diversity in two insular populations of bobcats (Lynx rufus)
TLDR
Compared to another bobcat population on Kiawah Island, South Carolina, USA, that was naturally established and experiences limited immigration from the mainland, the predictions of a novel population viability analysis ( PVA) were compared to empirical estimates of abundance and genetic diversity on CUIS and management actions that are likely to support long-term viability were identified.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 84 REFERENCES
Urban Habitat Fragmentation and Genetic Population Structure of Bobcats in Coastal Southern California
Abstract Although habitat fragmentation is recognized as a primary threat to biodiversity, the effects of urban development on genetic population structure vary among species and landscapes and are
Effects of Urbanization and Habitat Fragmentation on Bobcats and Coyotes in Southern California
Abstract: Urbanization and habitat fragmentation are major threats to wildlife populations, especially mammalian carnivores. We studied the ecology and behavior of bobcats (   Lynx rufus ) and
Spatial Ecology of Bobcats and Gray Foxes in Urban and Rural Zones of a National Park
Abstract Urbanization threatens the persistence of many wildlife populations, particularly those of wide-ranging and low-density species such as mammalian carnivores. Effective conservation of
Relative Sensitivities of Mammalian Carnivores to Habitat Fragmentation
TLDR
Differential sensi- tivities are useful criteria for choosing appropriate focal species for ecological research and conservation planning, a choice that depends on the scale of fragmentation in a region and the commensurate responses of carnivore populations at that scale.
FAST‐TRACK: A southern California freeway is a physical and social barrier to gene flow in carnivores
TLDR
The results demonstrate that freeways can restrict gene flow even in wide‐ranging species and suggest that for territorial animals, migration levels across anthropogenic barriers need to be an order of magnitude larger than commonly assumed to counteract genetic differentiation.
Landscape modification and habitat fragmentation: a synthesis
Landscape modification and habitat fragmentation are key drivers of global species loss. Their effects may be understood by focusing on: (1) individual species and the processes threatening them, and
The Evolutionary Dynamics of the Lion Panthera leo Revealed by Host and Viral Population Genomics
TLDR
Lion and FIVPle variation affirms that the large, well-studied lion population occupying the greater Serengeti Ecosystem is derived from three distinct populations that admixed recently.
Epidemiology, Genetic Diversity, and Evolution of Endemic Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in a Population of Wild Cougars
TLDR
The premise that FIVpco is well adapted to its cougar host is supported and provide a basis for comparing lentivirus evolution in endemic and epidemic infections in natural hosts.
Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Conservation
A the many human activities that cause habitat loss (Czech et al. 2000), urban development produces some of the greatest local extinction rates and frequently eliminates the large majority of native
A Virus Reveals Population Structure and Recent Demographic History of Its Carnivore Host
TLDR
It is demonstrated that a fast-evolving virus (feline immunodeficiency virus) can reveal details of the contemporary population structure and recent demographic history of its natural wildlife host that were not apparent from host genetic data and would be impossible to obtain by other means.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...