Gene flow and genetic drift in urban environments

@article{Miles2019GeneFA,
  title={Gene flow and genetic drift in urban environments},
  author={Lindsay S Miles and L. Rivkin and Marc T. J. Johnson and J. Munshi-South and B. Verrelli},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2019},
  volume={28},
  pages={4138 - 4151}
}
Evidence is growing that human modification of landscapes has dramatically altered evolutionary processes. In urban population genetic studies, urbanization is typically predicted to act as a barrier that isolates populations of species, leading to increased genetic drift within populations and reduced gene flow between populations. However, urbanization may also facilitate dispersal among populations, leading to higher genetic diversity within, and lower differentiation between, urban… Expand
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