Gene conversion: mechanisms, evolution and human disease

@article{Chen2007GeneCM,
  title={Gene conversion: mechanisms, evolution and human disease},
  author={Jian-Min Chen and David N. Cooper and Nadia A. Chuzhanova and Claude F{\'e}rec and George P. Patrinos},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2007},
  volume={8},
  pages={762-775}
}
Gene conversion, one of the two mechanisms of homologous recombination, involves the unidirectional transfer of genetic material from a 'donor' sequence to a highly homologous 'acceptor'. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie gene conversion, its formative role in human genome evolution and its implications for human inherited disease. Here we assess current thinking about how gene conversion occurs, explore the key part it has played in… 

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