Gene Flow from the Indian Subcontinent to Australia Evidence from the Y Chromosome

@article{Redd2002GeneFF,
  title={Gene Flow from the Indian Subcontinent to Australia Evidence from the Y Chromosome},
  author={A. Redd and J. Roberts-Thomson and T. Karafet and M. Bamshad and L. Jorde and J. M. Naidu and B. Walsh and M. Hammer},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={12},
  pages={673-677}
}
Phenotypic similarities between Australian Aboriginal People and some tribes of India were noted by T.H. Huxley during the voyage of the Rattlesnake (1846-1850). Anthropometric studies by Birdsell led to his suggestion that a migratory wave into Australia included populations with affinities to tribal Indians. Genetic evidence for an Indian contribution to the Australian gene pool is contradictory; most studies of autosomal markers have not supported this hypothesis (; and references therein… Expand

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