Gene–culture coevolution and the nature of human sociality

@article{Gintis2011GenecultureCA,
  title={Gene–culture coevolution and the nature of human sociality},
  author={Herbert Gintis},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2011},
  volume={366},
  pages={878 - 888}
}
  • H. Gintis
  • Published 27 March 2011
  • Biology
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Human characteristics are the product of gene–culture coevolution, which is an evolutionary dynamic involving the interaction of genes and culture over long time periods. Gene–culture coevolution is a special case of niche construction. Gene–culture coevolution is responsible for human other-regarding preferences, a taste for fairness, the capacity to empathize and salience of morality and character virtues. 

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