Genders, sexes, and health: what are the connections--and why does it matter?

@article{Krieger2003GendersSA,
  title={Genders, sexes, and health: what are the connections--and why does it matter?},
  author={Nancy Krieger},
  journal={International journal of epidemiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={32 4},
  pages={
          652-7
        }
}
  • N. Krieger
  • Published 1 August 2003
  • Medicine
  • International journal of epidemiology
Open up any biomedical or public health journal prior to the 1970s, and one term will be glaringly absent: gender. Open up any recent biomedical or public health journal, and two terms will be used either: (1) interchangeably, or (2) as distinct constructs: gender and sex. Why the change? Why the confusion?-and why does it matter? After briefly reviewing conceptual debates leading to distinctions between 'sex' and 'gender' as biological and social constructs, respectively, the paper draws on… 
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