Gender role expectations of pain is associated with pain tolerance limit but not with pain threshold

@article{Defrin2009GenderRE,
  title={Gender role expectations of pain is associated with pain tolerance limit but not with pain threshold},
  author={Ruth Defrin and Libby Shramm and Ilana Eli},
  journal={PAIN{\textregistered}},
  year={2009},
  volume={145},
  pages={230-236}
}
ABSTRACT Gender role expectations of pain (GREP) was suggested to predict sex differences in pain perception. Our aim was to explore sex differences in GREP and investigate its relationship with heat‐pain threshold (HPT) and heat‐pain tolerance limit (HPTL). University students (115 males, 134 females) filled the GREP questionnaire. HPT and HPTL were measured in a sample of 72 students. Additionally, GREP values of the present sample were compared with those of the original, American sample to… Expand

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