Gender issues in fundamental physics: A bibliometric analysis

@article{Strumia2021GenderII,
  title={Gender issues in fundamental physics: A bibliometric analysis},
  author={Alessandro Strumia},
  journal={Quant. Sci. Stud.},
  year={2021},
  volume={2},
  pages={225-253}
}
  • A. Strumia
  • Published 1 October 2019
  • Physics
  • Quant. Sci. Stud.
I analyze bibliometric data about fundamental physics worldwide from 1970 to now, extracting quantitative data about gender issues. I do not find significant gender differences in hiring rates, hiring timing, career gaps and slowdowns, abandonment rates, citation, and self-citation patterns. Furthermore, various bibliometric indicators (number of fractionally counted papers, citations, etc.) exhibit a productivity gap at hiring moments, at career level, and without integrating over careers… 

Gender issues in fundamental physics: Strumia's bibliometric analysis fails to account for key confounders and confuses correlation with causation

TLDR
This paper aims to demonstrate the efforts towards in-situ applicability of EMMARM, as to provide real-time information about the response of the immune system to laser-spot assisted chemoreception.

Towards a moralization of bibliometrics? A response to Kyle Siler

  • Y. Gingras
  • Philosophy
    Quantitative Science Studies
  • 2022
Abstract In a recent letter to QSS, Kyle Siler (2021), made harsh comments against the decision of the editors to publish a controversial paper signed by Alessandro Strumia (2021) about gender

Are there biases in decisions to tweet on scientific papers? A plea for conducting an experimental Twitter study. Technical note

TLDR
The design of a study is described that might allow the experimental investigation of tweet decisions including randomized variations and theoretically derived mechanisms for explaining the empirical results.

Why Does Workplace Gender Diversity Matter? Justice, Organizational Benefits, and Policy

Why does workplace gender diversity matter? Here, we provide a review of the literature on both justice‐based and organizational benefits of workplace gender diversity that, importantly, is informed

L’Affaire Strumia reveals troubling gatekeeping values and outcomes at Quantitative Science Studies

Much ink has already been spilled about Strumia (2021). Shortly afterQSS agreed to publish the article, Cassidy Sugimoto—current ISSI president and QSS editorial board member—told Science the article

Values matter in science, so do facts: Response to Gingras

  • Kyle Siler
  • Philosophy
    Quantitative Science Studies
  • 2022
Following my letter to QSS (Siler, 2021), Yves Gingras (2022) responded with a variety of bad faith arguments, ad hominem attacks, and hyperbole. Gingras repeatedly distorted what I actually wrote,

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 214 REFERENCES

Gender issues in fundamental physics: Strumia's bibliometric analysis fails to account for key confounders and confuses correlation with causation

TLDR
This paper aims to demonstrate the efforts towards in-situ applicability of EMMARM, as to provide real-time information about the response of the immune system to laser-spot assisted chemoreception.

Quantitative Evaluation of Gender Bias in Astronomical Publications from Citation Counts

TLDR
The role of first (leading) author gender on the number of citations that a paper receives, on the publishing frequency and on the self-citing tendency is analyzed, which shows that papers authored by females receive 10.4% fewer citations than what would be expected if the papers with the same non-gender specific properties were written by the male authors.

Gender differences in research productivity: A bibliometric analysis of the Italian academic system

TLDR
Through bibliometric examination of the entire population of research personnel working in the scientific-technological disciplines of Italian university system, this study confirms the presence of significant differences in productivity between men and women.

The Role of Gender in Scholarly Authorship

TLDR
A large-scale analysis based on over eight million papers across the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities reveals a number of understated and persistent ways in which gender inequities remain.

High‐Citation Papers in Space Physics: Examination of Gender, Country, and Paper Characteristics

The number of citations to a refereed journal article from other refereed journal articles is a measure of its impact. Papers, individuals, journals, departments, and institutions are increasingly

Solving the Productivity and Impact Puzzle: Do Men Outperform Women, or are Metrics Biased?

The attrition of women from science with increasing career stage continues, suggesting that current strategies are unsuccessful. Research evaluation using unbiased metrics could be important for the

Sex differences in the number of scientific publications and citations when attaining the rank of professor in Sweden

ABSTRACT The proportion of women tends to decrease the higher the academic rank, following a global pattern. Sweden has taken comprehensive measures to decrease this gap across 30 years, and many

Men Set Their Own Cites High: Gender and Self-citation across Fields and over Time

TLDR
This gender gap in self-citation rates has remained stable over the last 50 years, despite increased representation of women in academia, and has important implications for scholarly visibility and cumulative advantage in academic careers.

Sex differences in research productivity : New evidence about an old puzzle

TLDR
Analysis of data from four large, nationally representative, cross-sectional surveys of postsecondary faculty in 1969, 1973, 1988, and 1993 suggests that sex Differences in research productivity stem from sex differences in structural locations and respond to the secular improvement of women's position in science.

Gender, Productivity, and Prestige in Computer Science Faculty Hiring Networks

TLDR
Investigation of the multi-dimensional nature of gender inequality in computer science faculty hiring through a network model of the hiring process finds that hiring outcomes are most directly affected by the relative prestige between hiring and placing institutions and the scholarly productivity of the candidates.
...