Gender differences in visuo-spatial processing: the importance of distinguishing between passive storage and active manipulation.

@article{Vecchi1998GenderDI,
  title={Gender differences in visuo-spatial processing: the importance of distinguishing between passive storage and active manipulation.},
  author={Tomaso Vecchi and Luisa Girelli},
  journal={Acta psychologica},
  year={1998},
  volume={99 1},
  pages={
          1-16
        }
}
The study here reported investigates the hypothesis that gender differences in visuo-spatial abilities are mainly confined to active processing tasks. Male and female participants were required to perform passive tasks involving the recall of previously memorized positions within matrices of different sizes, as well as active tasks in which they had to mentally follow a pathway in the same matrices. The results confirmed that male superiority became evident as the active processing requirements… 
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A jigsaw-puzzle imagery task for assessing active visuospatial processes in old and young people
  • John T. E. Richardson, T. Vecchi
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Behavior research methods, instruments, & computers : a journal of the Psychonomic Society, Inc
  • 2002
TLDR
A new task was developed involving the mental reconstruction of pictures of objects from fragmented pieces, and it is concluded that this ecologically relevant procedure constitutes a very powerful, sensitive, and reliable tool for identifying individual differences in visuospatial working memory.
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