Gender differences in the human mirror system: a magnetoencephalography study

@article{Cheng2006GenderDI,
  title={Gender differences in the human mirror system: a magnetoencephalography study},
  author={Ya-Wei Cheng and Ovid J. L. Tzeng and Jean Decety and Toshiaki Imada and J. C. Hsieh},
  journal={NeuroReport},
  year={2006},
  volume={17},
  pages={1115-1119}
}
The present study investigated whether the human mirror-neuron system exhibits gender differences. Neuromagenetic mu (∼20 Hz) oscillations were recorded over the right primary motor cortex, which reflect the mirror neuron activity, in 10 female and 10 male participants while they observed the videotaped hand actions and moving dot. In accordance with previous studies, all participants had mu suppression during the observation of hand action, indicating activation of primary motor cortex… 
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