Gender differences in the effect of tobacco use on brain phosphocreatine levels in methamphetamine-dependent subjects.

@article{Sung2015GenderDI,
  title={Gender differences in the effect of tobacco use on brain phosphocreatine levels in methamphetamine-dependent subjects.},
  author={Young-Hoon Sung and Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd and Douglas G. Kondo and Xian-Feng Shi and Kelly J Lundberg and Tracy Hellem and Rebekah S. Huber and Erin McGlade and E. Jeong and Perry F. Renshaw},
  journal={The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse},
  year={2015},
  volume={41 4},
  pages={281-9}
}
BACKGROUND A high prevalence of tobacco smoking has been observed in methamphetamine users, but there have been no in vivo brain neurochemistry studies addressing gender effects of tobacco smoking in methamphetamine users. Methamphetamine addiction is associated with increased risk of depression and anxiety in females. There is increasing evidence that selective analogues of nicotine, a principal active component of tobacco smoking, may ease depression and improve cognitive performance in… CONTINUE READING