Gender differences in social network development via mobile phone text messages: A longitudinal study

@article{Igarashi2005GenderDI,
  title={Gender differences in social network development via mobile phone text messages: A longitudinal study},
  author={Tasuku Igarashi and J. Takai and T. Yoshida},
  journal={Journal of Social and Personal Relationships},
  year={2005},
  volume={22},
  pages={691 - 713}
}
  • Tasuku Igarashi, J. Takai, T. Yoshida
  • Published 2005
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Social and Personal Relationships
  • We examined the development of face-to-face (FTF) social networks and mobile/cell phone text message (MPTM)-mediated social networks, and gender differences in the social network structure of 64 male and 68 female first-year undergraduate students. Social network analysis showed that MPTM social networks consisted of dyadic relationships, and its growth was slower than FTF social networks. The intimacy of friends who communicate via both FTF and MPTM was rated higher than those who communicate… CONTINUE READING

    Figures and Tables from this paper.

    Negotiating Social Belonging: Online, Offline, and In-Between
    • 7
    • PDF
    Text Messaging and Connectedness Within Close Interpersonal Relationships
    • 132
    Bounded Solidarity Confirmed? How Korean Immigrants' Mobile Communication Configures Their Social Networks
    • 11
    • PDF

    References

    Publications referenced by this paper.
    SHOWING 1-10 OF 77 REFERENCES
    Social network development and functioning during a life transition.
    • 67
    [The effect of the use of mobile phone text messages on freshmen's loneliness during the transition to college].
    • 12
    Using E-mail for Personal Relationships
    • 321
    • PDF
    Structural Determinants of Men's and Women's Personal Networks
    • 808
    • PDF
    The Strength of Weak Ties
    • 32,752
    • PDF
    Sex differences in same-sex friendship
    • 414
    Sex and Social Participation
    • 235
    Mobiles and the Norwegian teen: identity, gender and class
    • 191