Gender differences in self-reported camouflaging in autistic and non-autistic adults

@article{Hull2019GenderDI,
  title={Gender differences in self-reported camouflaging in autistic and non-autistic adults},
  author={Laura Hull and Meng-Chuan Lai and Simon Baron-Cohen and Carrie Allison and Paula L. Smith and K. V. Petrides and William Mandy},
  journal={Autism},
  year={2019},
  volume={24},
  pages={352 - 363}
}
Social camouflaging describes the use of strategies to compensate for and mask autistic characteristics during social interactions. A newly developed self-reported measure of camouflaging (Camouflaging Autistic Traits Questionnaire) was used in an online survey to measure gender differences in autistic (n = 306) and non-autistic adults (n = 472) without intellectual disability for the first time. Controlling for age and autistic-like traits, an interaction between gender and diagnostic status… 
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