Gender differences in memory processing: Evidence from event-related potentials to faces

@article{Guillem2005GenderDI,
  title={Gender differences in memory processing: Evidence from event-related potentials to faces},
  author={F. Guillem and M. Mograss},
  journal={Brain and Cognition},
  year={2005},
  volume={57},
  pages={84-92}
}
This study investigated gender differences on memory processing using event-related potentials (ERPs). Behavioral data and ERPs were recorded in 16 males and 10 females during a recognition memory task for faces. The behavioral data results showed that females performed better than males. Gender differences on ERPs were evidenced over anterior locations and involve the modulation of two spatially and temporally distinct components. These results are in general accordance with the view that… Expand
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