Gender and the Use of Exclamation Points in Computer-Mediated Communication: An Analysis of Exclamations Posted to Two Electronic Discussion Lists

@article{Waseleski2006GenderAT,
  title={Gender and the Use of Exclamation Points in Computer-Mediated Communication: An Analysis of Exclamations Posted to Two Electronic Discussion Lists},
  author={Carol Waseleski},
  journal={J. Computer-Mediated Communication},
  year={2006},
  volume={11},
  pages={1012-1024}
}
Past research has reported that females use exclamation points more frequently than do males. Such research often characterizes exclamation points as ‘‘markers of excitability,’’ a term that suggests instability and emotional randomness, yet it has not necessarily examined the contexts in which exclamation points appeared for evidence of ‘‘excitability.’’ The present study uses a 16-category coding frame in a content analysis of 200 exclamations posted to two electronic discussion groups… CONTINUE READING
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