Gender and schizophrenia: implications for understanding the heterogeneity of the illness.

Abstract

This study begins to test the hypothesis that schizophrenic men and women may be at risk for experiencing different subtypes of the illness. Given past research, hypotheses predict that schizophrenic men will have an earlier age of onset, poorer premorbid history, lower family morbid risk, and poorer course. Data consist of 332 schizophrenic patients diagnosed according to DSM-III and 713 of their first-degree relatives from the double-blind Iowa 500 and non-500 family studies. Survival analysis was used to estimate age of onset, and Strömgren's abridged method for age correction was used to estimate family morbidity risks. Findings support our hypotheses and suggest that men may be at risk for experiencing a more severe form of schizophrenia.

Statistics

051015'92'95'98'01'04'07'10'13'16
Citations per Year

93 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 93 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Goldstein1989GenderAS, title={Gender and schizophrenia: implications for understanding the heterogeneity of the illness.}, author={Jill M. Goldstein and Ming T. Tsuang and Stephen V Faraone}, journal={Psychiatry research}, year={1989}, volume={28 3}, pages={243-53} }