Gender and competition in adolescence: task matters

@article{Dreber2014GenderAC,
  title={Gender and competition in adolescence: task matters},
  author={Anna Dreber and Emma von Essen and Eva Ranehill},
  journal={Experimental Economics},
  year={2014},
  volume={17},
  pages={154-172}
}
We look at gender differences among adolescents in Sweden in preferences for competition, altruism and risk. For competitiveness, we explore two different tasks that differ in associated stereotypes. We find no gender difference in competitiveness when comparing performance under competition to that without competition. We further find that boys and girls are equally likely to self-select into competition in a verbal task, but that boys are significantly more likely to choose to compete in a… 
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