Gender Differences in Risk Behaviour: Does Nurture Matter?

@article{Booth2009GenderDI,
  title={Gender Differences in Risk Behaviour: Does Nurture Matter?},
  author={Alison Booth and Patrick James Nolen},
  journal={Wiley-Blackwell: Economic Journal},
  year={2009}
}
  • A. Booth, P. Nolen
  • Published 1 March 2009
  • Psychology
  • Wiley-Blackwell: Economic Journal
Women and men may differ in their propensity to choose a risky outcome because of innate preferences or because pressure to conform to gender-stereotypes encourages girls and boys to modify their innate preferences. Single-sex environments are likely to modify students' risk-taking preferences in economically important ways. To test this, we designed a controlled experiment in which subjects were given an opportunity to choose a risky outcome - a real-stakes gamble with a higher expected… 
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