Gender Differences in Cooperation and Competition

@article{Vugt2007GenderDI,
  title={Gender Differences in Cooperation and Competition},
  author={Mark van Vugt and David De Cremer and Dirk P. Janssen},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={18},
  pages={19 - 23}
}
Evolutionary scientists argue that human cooperation is the product of a long history of competition among rival groups. There are various reasons to believe that this logic applies particularly to men. In three experiments, using a step-level public-goods task, we found that men contributed more to their group if their group was competing with other groups than if there was no intergroup competition. Female cooperation was relatively unaffected by intergroup competition. These findings suggest… 

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