Gender, Race, and Perceived Environmental Risk: The “White Male” Effect in Cancer Alley, LA

@inproceedings{Brent2004GenderRA,
  title={Gender, Race, and Perceived Environmental Risk: The “White Male” Effect in Cancer Alley, LA},
  author={K Brent},
  year={2004}
}
Research on risk perceptions are replete with race- and gender-specific hypotheses attempting to account for attitudinal variation. However, race and gender differences may mask more notable patterns across subgroups, patterns that lie at the intersection of race and gender. Recent national studies suggest that being a White male leads to lower risk perceptions and greater willingness to accept risks. This article extends this research by examining the “White male” effect in a chronically… CONTINUE READING

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An Investigation of the 'White Male Effect' from a Psychometric Perspective

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