Gender, Job Authority, and Depression

@article{Pudrovska2014GenderJA,
  title={Gender, Job Authority, and Depression},
  author={Tetyana Pudrovska and Amelia Karraker},
  journal={Journal of Health and Social Behavior},
  year={2014},
  volume={55},
  pages={424 - 441}
}
Using the 1957-2004 data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, we explore the effect of job authority in 1993 (at age 54) on the change in depressive symptoms between 1993 and 2004 (age 65) among white men and women. Within-gender comparisons indicate that women with job authority (defined as control over others’ work) exhibit more depressive symptoms than women without job authority, whereas men in authority positions are overall less depressed than men without job authority. Between-gender… Expand

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