Gaze capture by eye-of-origin singletons: interdependence with awareness.

@article{Zhaoping2012GazeCB,
  title={Gaze capture by eye-of-origin singletons: interdependence with awareness.},
  author={Li Zhaoping},
  journal={Journal of vision},
  year={2012},
  volume={12 2},
  pages={
          17
        }
}
  • L. Zhaoping
  • Published 17 February 2012
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of vision
Where we look in visual tasks is determined by both bottom-up and top-down factors. One theory (Li, 1999a, 2002) suggests that visual area V1 creates a bottom-up saliency map, guiding gaze through extensive projections to the superior colliculus. V1 is the only visual cortical area that represents the eye of origin of an input and is also least associated with awareness; I therefore predicted that an ocular singleton (i.e., an item only shown to one eye among other items shown to the other eye… 
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