Gaze and arrow cueing of attention reveals individual differences along the autism spectrum as a function of target context.

@article{Bayliss2005GazeAA,
  title={Gaze and arrow cueing of attention reveals individual differences along the autism spectrum as a function of target context.},
  author={Andrew P Bayliss and Steven P. Tipper},
  journal={British journal of psychology},
  year={2005},
  volume={96 Pt 1},
  pages={95-114}
}
Observing averted gaze results in a reflexive shift of attention to the gazed-at location. In two experiments, participants scoring high and low on the Autism-Spectrum Quotient questionnaire (AQ; Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, Skinner, Martin, & Clubley, 2001) observed arrow and gaze cues to investigate cueing effect magnitude as a function of the context in which peripheral targets could appear. While identical cueing effects were found with gaze and arrow cues, the more striking results concerned… CONTINUE READING