Gawain's Practice of Piety in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

@article{Hardman1999GawainsPO,
  title={Gawain's Practice of Piety in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight},
  author={P. Hardman},
  journal={Medium Aevum},
  year={1999},
  volume={68},
  pages={247}
}
It has become a critical commonplace that an important element in the ingenious symmetry of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is the pairing of the pentangle and the girdle, the two tokens or signs that the hero carries on his journey to the Green Chapel. In a recent study the poet's design is epitomized thus: 'Gawain leaves Camelot armed with the golden pentangle. He leaves Hautdesert armed with the green girdle'; the girdle is read as placed in opposition to the pentangle, a 'symbolic contrast… Expand
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