Gauge Freedom in Orbital Mechanics

@article{Efroimsky2005GaugeFI,
  title={Gauge Freedom in Orbital Mechanics},
  author={Michael Efroimsky},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={1065}
}
  • M. Efroimsky
  • Published 1 December 2005
  • Physics
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Abstract: Both orbital and attitude dynamics employ the method of variation of parameters. In a non‐perturbed setting, the coordinates (or the Euler angles) are expressed as functions of the time and six adjustable constants called elements. Under disturbance, each such expression becomes ansatz, the “constants” being endowed with time dependence. The perturbed velocity (linear or angular) consists of a partial time derivative and a convective term containing time derivatives of the “constants… 

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