Gastrointestinal Factors in Autistic Disorder: A Critical Review

@article{Erickson2005GastrointestinalFI,
  title={Gastrointestinal Factors in Autistic Disorder: A Critical Review},
  author={Craig A. Erickson and Kimberly A. Stigler and Mark R. Corkins and David J. Posey and Joseph F. Fitzgerald and Christopher J. McDougle},
  journal={Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
  year={2005},
  volume={35},
  pages={713-727}
}
Interest in the gastrointestinal (GI) factors of autistic disorder (autism) has developed from descriptions of symptoms such as constipation and diarrhea in autistic children and advanced towards more detailed studies of GI histopathology and treatment modalities. This review attempts to critically and comprehensively analyze the literature as it applies to all aspects of GI factors in autism, including discussion of symptoms, pathology, nutrition, and treatment. While much literature is… Expand
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