Gaping Displays Reveal and Amplify a Mechanically Based Index of Weapon Performance

@article{Lappin2006GapingDR,
  title={Gaping Displays Reveal and Amplify a Mechanically Based Index of Weapon Performance},
  author={A. Lappin and Y. Brandt and J. Husak and J. Macedonia and D. Kemp},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2006},
  volume={168},
  pages={100 - 113}
}
Physical prowess, a key determinant of fight outcomes, is contingent on whole‐organism performance traits. The advertisement of performance, via display, is poorly understood because it is unclear how information about performance is encoded into display characteristics. Previous studies have shown that weapon performance (i.e., bite force) predicts dominance and reproductive success in male lizards. We tested the hypothesis that gaping displays by adult male collared lizards (Crotaphytus) can… Expand

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