Gamma-Ray Bursts and Type Ic Supernova SN 1998bw

@article{Woosley1998GammaRayBA,
  title={Gamma-Ray Bursts and Type Ic Supernova SN 1998bw},
  author={S. E. Woosley and Ronald G. Eastman and B P Schmidt},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={1998},
  volume={516},
  pages={788-796}
}
Recently a Type Ic supernova, SN 1998bw, was discovered coincident with a gamma-ray burst, GRB 980425. The supernova had unusual radio, optical, and spectroscopic properties. Among other things, it was especially bright for a Type Ic both optically and in the radio, and it rose quickly to maximum. We explore here models based upon helium stars in the range 9-14 M☉ and carbon-oxygen stars 6-11 M☉, which experience unusually energetic explosions (kinetic energy 0.5-2.8 × 1052 ergs). Bolometric… 

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