Gamma, fast, and ultrafast waves of the brain: Their relationships with epilepsy and behavior

@article{Hughes2008GammaFA,
  title={Gamma, fast, and ultrafast waves of the brain: Their relationships with epilepsy and behavior},
  author={John Russell Hughes},
  journal={Epilepsy \& Behavior},
  year={2008},
  volume={13},
  pages={25-31}
}
  • J. R. Hughes
  • Published 1 July 2008
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Epilepsy & Behavior
A Neurodynamic Model of Inter-Brain Coupling in the Gamma Band
TLDR
A biophysical explanation for the emergence of Gamma inter-brain coupling is provided using a Kuramoto model of four oscillators divided into two separate (brain) units and a theoretical explanation of the observed Gamma-IBC phenomenon is provided in the EEG-hyperscanning literature.
Common time-frequency analysis of local field potential and pyramidal cell activity in seizure-like events of the rat hippocampus.
TLDR
Evidence of strong commonality in various frequency bands of I-E SLEs in the rat hippocampus, not only during SSEs but also immediately before and after, is provided.
Absence seizure susceptibility correlates with pre-ictal β oscillations
Gamma (30–80Hz) bicoherence distinguishes seizures in the human epileptic brain
TLDR
The results highlight the bicoherence of the gamma frequency band (30-80 Hz) as an ictal identifier, and suggest an active role of this fast frequency during seizures.
Frequency interactions in human epileptic brain
TLDR
Wavelet phase coherence (WPC) was strongest in the 1–4Hz frequency range during both seizure and non-seizure activities; however, WPC values varied minimally between electrode pairings; the 13–30Hz band showed the lowest WPCvalues during seizure activity.
Lack of kainic acid‐induced gamma oscillations predicts subsequent CA1 excitotoxic cell death
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the emergence of low‐frequency Gamma oscillations predicts increased resistance to KA‐induced excitotoxicity, raising the possibility that gamma oscillations may have potential prognostic value in the treatment of epilepsy.
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