Gamergates in the Australian ant subfamily Myrmeciinae

@article{Dietemann2004GamergatesIT,
  title={Gamergates in the Australian ant subfamily Myrmeciinae},
  author={Vincent Dietemann and Christian Peeters and Bert Hölldobler},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2004},
  volume={91},
  pages={432-435}
}
Ant workers can mate and reproduce in a few hundreds of species belonging to the phylogenetically basal poneromorph subfamilies (sensu Bolton 2003). We report the first occurrence of gamergates (i.e. mated reproductive workers) in a myrmeciomorph subfamily. In a colony of Myrmecia pyriformis that was collected without a queen, workers continued to be produced over a period of 3 years in the laboratory. Behavioural observations and ovarian dissections indicated that three workers were mated and… 

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