Game theory: Losing strategies can win by Parrondo's paradox

@article{Harmer1999GameTL,
  title={Game theory: Losing strategies can win by Parrondo's paradox},
  author={Gregory Peter Harmer and Derek Abbott},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1999},
  volume={402},
  pages={864-864}
}
In a game of chess, pieces can sometimes be sacrificed in order to win the overall game. Similarly, engineers know that two unstable systems, if combined in the right way, can paradoxically become stable. But can two losing gambling games be set up such that, when they are played one after the other, they becoming winning? The answer is yes. This is a striking new result in game theory called Parrondo's paradox, after its discoverer, Juan Parrondo1, 2. Here we model this behaviour as a flashing… 
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In game theory, Parrondo's paradox describes the possibility of achieving winning outcomes by alternating between losing strategies. The framework had been conceptualized from a physical phenomenon
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