Game of Tropes: Exploring the Placebo Effect in Computational Creativity

@inproceedings{Veale2015GameOT,
  title={Game of Tropes: Exploring the Placebo Effect in Computational Creativity},
  author={Tony Veale},
  booktitle={ICCC},
  year={2015}
}
Twitter has proven itself a rich and varied source of language data for linguistic analysis. For Twitter is more than a popular new channel for social interaction in language; in many ways it constitutes a whole new genre of text, as users adapt to its new limitations (140 character messages) and to its novel conventions such as retweeting and hash-tagging. But Twitter presents an opportunity of another kind to computationally-minded researchers of language, a generative opportunity to study… CONTINUE READING

Similar Papers

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 10 CITATIONS

When Worlds and Scripts Collide

  • HCI
  • 2016
VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
CITES BACKGROUND

Unnatural Selection: Seeing Human Intelligence in Artificial Creations

  • J. Artificial General Intelligence
  • 2015
VIEW 1 EXCERPT
CITES BACKGROUND

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 31 REFERENCES

What happens when @everyword ends? Intersect, Washington Post, May 23 edition

Caitlin Dewey
  • 2014
VIEW 1 EXCERPT

What happens when @everyword ends? Intersect, Washington Post, May 23 edition

Caitlin Dewey
  • 2014
VIEW 1 EXCERPT

Web 1T 5-gram database, Version 1

Thorsten Brants, Alex Franz.
  • Linguistic Data Consortium.
  • 2006