GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence

@inproceedings{Collaboration2016GW151226OO,
  title={GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence},
  author={The Ligo Scientific Collaboration and The Virgo Collaboration},
  year={2016}
}
We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was initially identified within 70 s by an online matched-filter search targeting binary coalescences. Subsequent off-line analyses recovered GW151226 with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a… 

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