GROWTH IN SMALL DINOSAURS AND PTEROSAURS: THE EVOLUTION OF ARCHOSAURIAN GROWTH STRATEGIES

@inproceedings{Padian2004GROWTHIS,
  title={GROWTH IN SMALL DINOSAURS AND PTEROSAURS: THE EVOLUTION OF ARCHOSAURIAN GROWTH STRATEGIES},
  author={Kevin Padian and John R. Horner and Armand J. de Ricql{\`e}s},
  year={2004}
}
Abstract Histological evidence of the bones of pterosaurs and dinosaurs indicates that the typically large forms of these groups grew at rates more comparable to those of birds and mammals than to those of other living reptiles. However, Scutellosaurus, a small, bipedal, basal thyreophoran ornithischian dinosaur of the Early Jurassic, shows histological features in its skeletal tissues that suggest relatively lower growth rates than in those of larger dinosaurs. In these respects Scutellosaurus… 
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